Brand Secrets from Publicist Dana Kaye | MWW Ongoing | Starts Dec. 7

MWW Ongoing is pleased to offer a new, exclusive 4-week course:

YOUR AUTHOR BRAND

with Dana Kaye of Kaye Publicity, Inc.

Author of Your Book, Your Brand

Registration Available Wednesday, December 7th

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“I wholeheartedly recommend Dana Kaye’s Your Book, Your Brand. In the years I’ve known and worked with Dana, her ideas and strategies have been pragmatic, effective and cost efficient. I count her as an amazing and essential resource for my clients and the agency. I plan to buy this book by the carton and distribute it not just to clients but to my writer friends as well.”

— Janet Reid, of queryshark.blogspot.com, Agent at Fine Print Literary

Brighten your winter with must-see tips on author branding from Dana Kaye, the highly-respected publicist and founder of Kaye Publicity.

This 4-week online study with content exclusively created for the MWW community is for all authors, regardless of where they are in the publishing process. Authors will receive guidance on understanding, the importance of branding and how it applies to them. Aspiring authors will learn how to establish their brand prior to publishing their first book and veteran authors will learn how to create an author brand that embodies the scope of their work in a compelling, memorable way.

Register now and receive the first lesson December 7th and each subsequent class on the following three Wednesdays. Or feel free to join any time through January, and catch up with the classes on your own schedule.

Why is this course important?

Readers (and publishers) are risk averse. They want to know what they’re going to get before they buy. According to Nielsen’s PubTrack Consumer Survey, the #1 reason consumers purchase a book is because they like the author. The #2 reason is that they enjoyed other books in that series. These readers account for 60% of all readers surveyed. So how does a debut or midlist author build a readership? By establishing a favorable, memorable author brand.

What will this course cover?

This course will take you through each step of the branding process, from creation to establishing that brand online. You’ll form a brand summary and tagline, identify which online platforms are ideal for launching your brand, develop a content strategy, and learn how to cultivate relationships online. Lectures include:

  • Branding Workshop
  • Online Platforms
  • Content Strategy
  • Community Building

Students registering for this course will have access to a private Facebook group: MWW + Your Author Brand. The group provides a private place for you to ask questions and have conversations with each other. You’ll receive an invite to join this private Facebook group within a few days of registering. Stay connected and form a writing community with others in the course.

Hint: Our students say that receiving the course weekly is motivating and makes participating in our Facebook group a bit more focused. So sign up now, and we think you’ll be glad you did. That said, we know it’s a busy time and when you sign up is not as important as just making sure that you don’t miss this class.

Cost: $150

You won’t want to miss this instruction. Spend your winter time wisely and develop your brand in time for spring or sooner.

REGISTER HERE TODAY!

Who is Dana Kaye?

dana-kaye-for-publicityDana Kaye is a veteran publicist, social media pro, and brand manager. In 2009, she founded  Kaye Publicity, Inc., a boutique PR company specializing in publishing and entertainment. Known for her innovative ideas and knowledge of current trends, she coaches her clients on how to identify and establish their unique personal brands. Kaye is also the author of  Your Book, Your Brand: The Step-by-Step Guide to Launching Your Book and Boosting Your Sales, published by Diversion Books, and founder of Branding Outside the Box, an online platform that coaches users on how to establish their personal brands.

MWW friends & past faculty in anthology: Not Like the Rest of Us

ANNOUNCING …

Indiana Writers Center has a publication for the book lovers on your holiday gift list! Not Like the Rest of Us: An Anthology of Contemporary  Indiana Writers  features stories, poems, and essays more than 75 Indiana writers, including MWW past faculty and friends:

Kelsey Timmerman, “The Labors of Our Fathers”

Cathy Day, “Not Like the Rest of Us: A Hoosier Named Cole Porter”

Philip Gulley, “The Hoosier Identity”

Barbara Shoup, “Working a Jigsaw”

Eugene Gloria, “Alfonso Street”

Karen Kovacik, “Assemblage: Lake County”

David Shumate, “Bringing Things Back From the Woods”

Kevin Stein, “The Tragedies”

Lucrecia Guerrero, “Rings”

Michael Martone, “Contributor’s Notes”

Susan Neville, “Jubilee”

Jill Christman, “That’s What You Remember [An Essay in Third Person]”

Mark Neely, “Extremist Sonnet”

Sean Lovelace, “Elvis Presley Visits His Red Harley”

 

This is a great read for the coming wintry days. Now at a special holiday price! Purchase copies for your friends (and one for yourself)!

 

Gift certificates for all the writerly things

The Write Gift — write here, write now

82ec34b1-0761-48e4-8731-97da6107a09aGift certificates for all the writerly things

Every writer wants to get better, and the best way to do that is in a supportive, welcoming community. That’s why Midwest Writers Workshop is now offering gift certificates in any amount. Nudge the writer in your life to take that next step.

We will snail mail you a personalized certificate, good for one year from purchase date, that can be applied towards any of our offerings, including:

  • MWW Ongoing (online classes and webinars)
  • Membership in MWW Plus, which offers discounts on all learning opportunities–webinars, workshops, online classes, and mentoring services–plus other benefits exclusive to the MWW Plus Community
  • Our 2017 Midwest Writers Workshop (held July 20-22) — apply to Part I, Part II, or both
  • Workshop extras: manuscript evaluations, query critique, head shots, and other professional appointments offered as part of MWW
  • MWW merchandise offered for sale at our events
  • Mini Workshops (1-2 offered per year) — watch our website and our E-pistle for details about the next one, coming up on March 18
  • and more.

Check out this great faculty for our 44th summer workshop! And pass along to your writer friends.

AUTHORS:

  • John Gilstrap – author of the best-selling Jonathan Grave suspense thriller novels
  • Jess Lourey – author of the Lefty-nominated Murder-by-Month mysteries and Rewrite Your Life
  • Amy Reichert – author of women’s novels The Coincidence of Coconut Cake and Love, Luck & Lemon Pie, and The Simplicity of Cider
  • Melissa Marino – author of women’s novel So Twisted
  • Becky Albertalli – author of the award-winning young adult novel, Simon vs. the Homo Sapiens Agenda and The Upside of Unrequited
  • Angie Thomas – author of the young adult novel The Hate U Give
  • Mike Mullin – author of the young adult Ashfall Series
  • Mardi Jo Link – author of the memoirs The Drummond Girls: A Story of Fierce Friendship Beyond Time and Chance and Bootstrapper: From Broke to Badass On a Northern Michigan Farm
  • Ruth McNally Barshaw – author and illustrator of children’s books including the Ellie McDoodle diaries
  • Nina Sadowsky – screenwriter, producer, and author of romantic psychological novel Just Fall
  • Dee Romito – author of middle grade novel, The BFF Bucket List, and guru for Scrivener writing software
  • Sarah Cannon – author of middle grade novel Oddity
  • Bronwen Dickey – contributing editor at The Oxford American and the author of Pit Bull: The Battle over an American Icon
  • Ashley Ford – essayist, co-editor of the anthology with Roxane Gay, and featured opening writer on Lena Dunham’s Not That Kind of Girl book tour
  • Brenda Drake – author young adult novels and creator of #PitchWars Contest
  • Kelly O. Stanley – author of Praying Upside Down and Designed to Pray, and graphic artist
  • Rena Olsen – author of thriller novel The Girl Before
  • D.E. Johnson – author of the Detroit-based Will Anderson historical mystery series, The Detroit Electric Scheme named one of Booklist’s Top Ten First Crime Novels
  • Matthew Clemens – co-author with Max Allen Collins of the Reeder and Rogers thriller series
  • Holly Miller – nonfiction writer and author of Feature and Magazine Writing: Action, Angle and Anecdotes

AGENTS:

EDITORS:

INDUSTRY EXPERTS:

  • Jane Friedman – 20 years in the publishing industry, with expertise in digital media strategy for authors and publishers
  • Dana Kaye – Dana Kaye Publicity

 

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Make Your Online Writing Pay | Jane Friedman | Oct 10

Learn how to become a better online writer and monetize your work

Starting Monday (Oct. 10), Jane Friedman is teaching a new online course—“Make Your Online (and social media) Pay” through MWW Ongoing—that helps you learn how to market and promote yourself through online writing—as well as what it takes to monetize your online work. It’s a 4-week course ($200) that’s suitable for all types of authors, especially those who want to develop a long-term strategy for their online platform and creative work.

REGISTER HERE!

This course is for both unpublished and published book authors who wonder what they could or should be doing to market and promote themselves through online writing—whether that’s blogging, guest blogging, micro-publishing through social media, or contributing to sites such as Medium, The Huffington Post and other large clearinghouses of content.

The challenge for most book writers is that they haven’t had any professional experience or training in writing short pieces (or even social media posts!) that are ultimately skimmed quickly in online environments—particularly mobile environments. Writers have heard that blogging, or producing content for social media sites, can be an effective way to build a readership, but don’t understand how that happens especially when they have no audience and are unpublished.

This course helps authors make themselves and their work more visible through strategically written online pieces that get distributed and marketed to the right audiences in order to develop their author platform and build a readership over the long-term of their careers.

This course is about making your online writing efforts, especially those with a marketing intent, have a measurable and meaningful payoff—whether for your website/blog, social media, or someone else’s site. We’ll look at content strategies, measurement tools, marketing and promotion tactics, and specific ways to make your online content put money in your pocket.

Week 1: Best Practices of Online Writing and Blogging

  • Welcome from Jane
  • A Big-Picture Preface Before We Begin
  • Basic Principles of Online Writing
  • Blogging Basics (is it for you?)
  • 7 Principles of Good (Professional) Blogging
  • Don’t Forget the Important Role of Your Website

Week 2: Understanding Search Engine Optimization

Week 3: Marketing and Promoting Your Blog or Online Writing

Week 4: Monetizing Your Blog or Website

The Course That Helped Me Write My First Novel

by Gail Werner

gail-werner-photoThree years ago this month, I was scrolling through Facebook when I saw a post from my friend Cathy Day, an English professor at Ball State. It detailed her decision to offer her novel writing class online to anyone wanting to follow along.

Reading this news, I felt my pulse quicken. This is it, Gail, I told myself. This is your sign.

Except, it couldn’t be. Not when I had a 11-month-old son at home, a job at Ball State keeping me busy, and a photography business that was going strong.

I didn’t have time for signs, and yet something in my gut re-enforced what I knew was true: If I let the moment pass, I’d regret it for the rest of my life.

With shaking fingers, I signed up, not knowing it was a move that would forever tilt my creative compass true north.

Over the weeks that followed, I read through the half-dozen books Cathy assigned on her syllabus. I dove into each with a zeal I hadn’t experienced since journalism school. It was intoxicating learning something new again, especially something I was so passionate about—learning how to write a book!

Using the skills I picked up that semester, I went on to finish my first novel. Ever since, I’ve kept going: reading more, writing more, learning more. Today I’ve reached the point where I’ve completed my second novel and am now querying agents, hoping one of them wants to help me publish my work.

Often times when I tell people I’ve written a book, they get a dreamy look in their eyes and admit they want to write one, too. What I always want to say (but haven’t until now) is writing a novel is almost impossible without learning a bit of craft first.

Which is why I’m elated to announce, in partnership with Midwest Writers Workshop and its new MWW Ongoing online courses and webinars, Cathy is offering another introductory novel-writing class this fall!

“It’s Time to Start Your Novel” will span four weeks beginning October 1 and is meant for anyone who’s ever thought, “I think I have a novel inside me.” (Newsflash: If you’re thinking this, it probably means you do.)

The cost is $150 and I promise (from the very bottom of my heart), it’s worth every penny.

What you’re about to learn from Cathy is what’s true of any goal worth pursuing—you’re gonna need time and preparation to tackle it. Consider this class your first step.

Or, as Cathy describes it:

“Think of ‘It’s Time to Start Your Novel’ as a cooking course in which you spend the first class cleaning the kitchen and prepping the ingredients. Think of it as a marathon-running course in which you spend the first class buying a good pair of shoes. Your chances of drafting an entire novel (maybe for National Novel Writing Month?) increase exponentially when you spend some time preparing yourself for the journey ahead.”

All of that makes sense, right? So I’m wrapping up this post hoping this opportunity finds a few brave souls yearning for the same creative challenge I was that afternoon I found Cathy’s Facebook post. I had no idea what I was getting myself into or how all of the work and second-guessing would be worth it to chase the creative high I’d experience as a result.

If you have specific questions about the course—which will cover topics like how to develop a writing regimen, along with how to create characters and scenes for your future novel—send them my way. You can also ask about signing up for Midwest Writers Workshop 2017 or, better yet, find out how to become a member of our new MWW Plus to get a 10-percent discount on Cathy’s class along with future webinars and workshops MWW has to offer!

So come on then … take this chance on yourself.

Learn how to fit writing into your life.

If you do, then someday (2017 resolution, anyone?) you can know the joy of holding your first finished novel in your hands the same way I did.

 

Gold medal for MWW16!

Your evaluations, emails, tweets, posts have been read and tallied. The results are in!

The determination: gold medal for MWW16!

Sure, we weren’t perfect. We had a few deductions to our final score (parking, construction, A/C), but we received more high scores than low. And for our first year in a new facility, we were darn pleased that participants and faculty had a great time. The high marks included: our “killer deal,” 10+ for our social media tutoring, our spiral bound book of session notes, and 10+10 for our unique “Buttonhole the Experts” activity.

Comments in the hallways included: “I loved the diversity of topics and speakers/presenters.” “I met life-long friends here!” “AMAZING conference! Life-changing! I plan to be back!”

From July 21-23, a record-breaking 280 people who are passionate about writing — participants, faculty, interns, MWW staff — occupied the three floors of our new location at the L.A. Pittenger Student Center to listen, talk, write, share, pitch, question, eat, drink, laugh, challenge, commiserate — and, yes, rejoice.

From the ten intensive sessions of Part I to the 45 sessions of Part II, MWW16 offered participants opportunities to “find their tribe” and enjoy a genuine community which encouraged them to make connections and get to the next step in their writing. And what other writers’ conference provides a chance to bowl with a literary agent (or a T-Rex) and a massage therapist to relax you before your pitch?

Something special marked this 43rd annual workshop and these are some of the comments which pointed in this direction.

From the participants:

 “Thank you for helping me to pursue my life-long dream! You guys rock! You’re amazing!”

“In a solitary profession like writing, it’s sometimes difficult to connect with peers – or even realize that you have any. At MWW, I realized that the literary world is both large and small: there are many of us who come from across the country, but we are a tight knit group, bound by our mutual respect, appreciation, and encouragement of one another. I was expecting a community of writers at this conference – but I was not met. I was welcomed. – Valerie Weingart

“It was worth the trip from North Carolina! I’m going home with information and inspiration to aid my writing.” – Rebecca Paynter

“This was my first writers’ conference. MWW truly delivered on their promises. I  feel much more prepared to begin a writing career, and the atmosphere was perfect for connecting with so many amazing writers, authors, agents, and other members of the writing community. I am excited already for MWW 2017!” – Mary Rose Kreger

“Great content. Great community.” – Bo Thunboe

“Writing can be a lonely pursuit. The opportunity to find your tribe and make connections with other introverts tied to their computers was wonderful.” – Mary Robertson

“When you are stuck and alone in your writing journey, MWW will give you the kick in the pants you need. Stop wallowing and come find your people.” – Elizabeth Newman

“MWW is so inclusive of all writers’ wants and needs — topics, events, activities. This has been the best conference ever!” – Doris Smith

“As a young writer, this conference provided access to a variety of topics. I met other writers who immediately treated me with kindness and made me hopeful.” – Sarah Salow

From the faculty:

“Midwest Writers Workshop is a very special place for writers. I’ve been speaking and attending its sessions for nearly 15 years, and the sense of community and support is outstanding. It has played a role in launching numerous successful author careers-unsurprising, since it works so thoughtfully to fulfill its mission of helping writers flourish and be their best selves.” – Jane Friedman

“I’ll go just about anywhere to talk about the agony and ecstasy of writing fiction, but I’ve found the standard of excellence against which all writers conferences will be measured: the Midwest Writers Workshop in the Ball State University campus in Muncie, Indiana. Not only is the hospitality without peer, the staff is professional, the participants lively and whip-smart, the faculty engaging and edifying. Wanna believe that people still love to write and read? Come to Muncie!” – Tom Williams

“Please, please invite me to speak every year from now until infinity.” – Jen Malone

“Midwest Writers Workshop is the best workshop in the Midwest for writers no matter whether they are beginners or seasoned pros. The success stories are countless, and there’s a reason why.  This workshop is all about the writer from the moment the first sentence is written until the last goodbye is said.  It’s a five star event that prepares great writers to go out into the world and share their stories at the highest level.  I count this workshop as one of the main reasons that I have published twelve novels.” – Larry Sweazy

“It was a pleasure. And I already got a client out of it! I signed Jessica Rauh who I met in a pitch session!” – Jim McCarthy

Congratulations to the 2016 Manny Award winners! (and thanks to sponsor Matthew V. Clemens and Robin Vincent Publishing)

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Irene Fridsma – Poetry

Paula Mikrut - Nonfiction

Paula Mikrut – Nonfiction

Victor Suthammanont - Long Fiction

Victor Suthammanont – Long Fiction

Kathryn Page Camp - Short Fiction & winner of the Top Prize L. Karl Largent Award

Kathryn Page Camp – Short Fiction & winner of the Top Prize L. Karl Largent Award

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Irene Fridsma – Poetry

Paula Mikrut – Nonfiction

Victor Suthammanont – Long Fiction

Kathryn Page Camp – Short Fiction & winner of the Top Prize L. Karl Largent Award

 

***

MWW16 may be in our rear view mirrors, but a lot of what we experienced and learned will always remain. We invite you to view our  Photo Gallery and tag yourself on our Facebook Page, which are sure to bring back memories.

So we’re patting ourselves on the back. And for just a while, basking in the bright light that was #mww16 before we move on to our 44th MWW, July 20-22, 2017.

Q&A with Liz Pelletier, CEO & Publisher of Entangled Publishing

Liz Pelletier co-founded Entangled Publishing in 2011. Over the past four years, Entangled has gone from a small start-up to a bestselling romance publisher, with more than 17 NYT bestsellers and 39 USA Today bestsellers. Her out-of the-box approach to everything from pricing strategies to marketing to editorial allows Entangled to be both disruptive and agile within a dynamic publishing landscape. Liz continues to disrupt the publishing business with her launching of Entangled Music in 2015, where stories come to life through the extension of music.

Midwest Writers committee member Cathy Shouse interviewed Liz about coming to 43rd writers’ conference this week, July 21-23, 2016, in Muncie, IN.

MWW: Which publishing lines of Entangled will you hear pitches for?

LP: I’m happy to listen to pitches for any Entangled imprint.

MWW: How should someone best prepare to pitch to you? Should they bring a couple of pages or anything with them? Manuscript should be finished?

LP: The best way to prepare to pitch to me is to relax. Unless your book’s genre is really far off from what we publish, I’m going to request a full regardless of the pitch. Some people have a real talent for pitching a book verbally that doesn’t match the writing, and others fumble through their pitch but have an amazing voice in print. I can’t really tell if a book is going to be great until I read it! So relax, start with word count, genre, and if the book is completed or not, and just tell me the very basics of the conflict and what you love most about the story. The rest we can figure out after I read your manuscript!

MWW: Is there any story genre or sub that is saturated/not appropriate? (Is a mystery without a romance thread acceptable, for example?)

LP: We’re really focused on stories with a strong romantic arc at Entangled. However, we are actively acquiring women’s fiction with a romantic element at this time as long as the main protagonist is 35yo or younger and the tone is humorous. Paranormal is still a bit saturated, but we are looking for vampires and shifters again! Beyond that, I’m just looking for a great story that I can get lost in.

MWW: You were co-founder of Entangled Publishing in 2011, and by 2013, you started collaborating with MacMillan and St. Martin’s. What did it feel like to have this said about you? John Sargent, Macmillan’s CEO, said, “We are hugely impressed with Liz Pelletier’s vision and what she has accomplished in such a short time. We found her out-of-the-box approach to publishing incredibly exciting and saw potential to work together with her on several levels. We think Liz and Entangled have found a new way forward and we think we can help build on that remarkable success.”

LP: John Sargent’s comments were a highlight in my career thus far. He’s truly a visionary in the publishing world, and I’ve been delighted to try to blend a traditional approach to publishing with Entangled’s more out-of-the box approach to digital. Our partnership with Macmillan has been amazing, and we look forward to continuing the relationship for many years to come.

MWW: How would you briefly define episodic writing? How much of a problem is it in manuscripts you see and what’s the cure?

LP: I don’t mind episodic writing in certain genres, the writer just needs to be aware that end of scene hooks are vastly important in today’s saturated market. So ending a scene with a pretty bow, as would happen in most scenes of this style, simply is not strong enough to create a bestseller in the romance market. In addition, stringing together a series of small conflicts that can be resolved within the scene is a good way to lose the attention of a reader as there is no main, overarching and organic conflict pulling the reader forward in the story written as episodic fiction. Chicklit, as an example, can do quite well in this form of writing, however one would still need to address a larger, big picture conflict as well as end of scene hooks to create an unputdownable read.

And just for fun:

Twitter or Facebook?  Facebook

Print or e-book? ebook

Disney or Universal? Disney

Writing platform or story? STORY

As an editor, if you can’t have both, will you choose writing style over content or vice versa? Writing style

In addition to hearing pitches, Liz’s sessions include:

  • “Editor Q&A with April Osborn”
  • “How to Edit a Bestseller”